LIFE AFTER MORMONISM
Post-Mormon Group Therapy

  • Explore Spirituality

  • Become Present to Connect with Emotions

  • Strengthen Relationships and Improve Communication

  • Reclaim Authenticity

  • Convert Shame into Compassion

UNDERSTANDING
FAITH TRANSITION

Loss of faith can have serious psychological and social repurcussions, and despite what you've heard, it's not due to the loss of a Holy Ghost.

Turns out, there are REAL reasons this is so hard for you. Real grief, real disruption, real trauma.

Validate yourself if nobody else will. You're dealing with real sh*t. Good news is we can work with real sh*t.

(I don't know how to work with ghosts.)

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Book Club

WHY GROUP THERAPY?

EFFICACY: Humans are social creatures that regulate most effectively through safe human connection. The mutual sharing of experiences facilitated by a licensed professional can be extremely validating and empowers healing. Group therapy has been shown to be especially helpful for those suffering from various forms of grief and loss. Transitioning out of Mormonism comes with a lot of grief, loss of faith, community, confidence, spirituality, you name it.

STRUCTURED PARTICIPATION: In "Closed group therapy" you will be with the same group members across all sessions. This group is limited to ten individuals to allow more equal participation throughout the course.

AFFORDABILITY: Group therapy saves money because you only essentially split a fraction of the individual hourly rates with other participants. This "Life After Mormonism" group cuts the individual cost by 85%.

(Individual counseling is available separately.)

SIGN UP DETAILS

Sign up HERE.

During registration you will be asked to provide some demographic information. After you register you will be scheduled for a 10-15 minute phone call consultation to determine which approach is best for you.

Group therapy is not for everyone, and your licensed therapist will help you make sure you end up with what is best for you.

Group dynamics are important and harmony between participants is essential to effective therapy. This process is not meant to be exclusive, but to match preferences and ensure each group is working towards similar goals.

The final group composition will be determined based on availability as well as shared preferences.

Support Group